Sun & Skin News

History of Smoking Affects How the Body Fights Melanoma

According to a new study, melanoma patients with a history of smoking are more likely to die from the disease than patients who do not smoke. The study, funded by Cancer Research UK and published in the journal Cancer Research, found that melanoma patients with a history of smoking cigarettes are 40 percent less likely to survive the disease than those who have never smoked.

Healthy Skin: Made in the Shade?

Not only does shade give you a reprieve from the heat, but it can also help to protect you from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays, which can cause skin damage and even lead to skin cancer.

A “Sunscreen Gene”?

Why do some people seem to be resistant to skin cancer, while many of us (who regularly visit SkinCancer.org) seem prone to it? Turns out there’s a gene that’s at least partially responsible, according to a 2016 study.

Photoaging: What You Need to Know About the Other Kind of Aging

Wrinkles, fine lines and pigmentation are inevitable skin woes that often appear as we age. While we like to place blame on getting another year older, the main culprit is photoaging — damage to the skin caused by exposure to sunlight and ultraviolet (UV) light. Responsible for 90 percent of visible changes to the skin, photoaging is a direct result of cumulative sun damage you’ve been exposed to throughout your life.

How to Read a Sunscreen Label

Reading a sunscreen label shouldn’t be like deciphering a foreign language. But a 2015 study in JAMA Dermatology found that many people don’t understand how to read a sunscreen label or how the product protects the skin. Only 43 percent of survey respondents understood the meaning of an SPF value. Given these findings, we considered it a good time to brush up on sunscreen basics.

The Year in Skin Cancer News

We saw the FDA approve a groundbreaking drug, companies debut new technology to help increase our awareness of dangerous ultraviolet (UV) rays and lawmakers pass indoor tanning legislation.