Promoting Sun Safety in Your Community: Beaches and Swimming Pools

The combination of skin-baring swimwear and bright midday sun — when the sun is most intense and local beaches and pools are busiest — can be very harmful to your skin. Ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sand, concrete, and water, can also reflect off these surfaces, hitting your skin twice. Additionally, beach vacations often give rise to the kind of sun exposure associated with an increased risk of melanoma. Here are a few suggestions to help you promote sun safety at beaches, lakes, and pools:

  • Post signs about the risks of sun exposure.  Encourage employees to protect themselves by using sunscreen with an SPF of 30+, hats, shirts, sunglasses and shade, and to be role models for pool users.

  • Distribute brochures and display posters from our Health Fair Kit in changing areas to promote sun safety.

  • Be sure that lifeguards are sheltered by umbrellas or shade structures; make sure there are adequate umbrellas and shaded areas for visitors.

  • Provide employees with SFP 30 or higher sunscreen and urge its use.

  • Encourage all employees and visitors to wear hats and shirts.  Sell broad-brimmed hats and UV-filtering sunglasses at the refreshment stand.

  • Sell low-priced water-resistant or very water-resistant SPF 30 or higher sunscreen (sport sunscreens are a great option) at the refreshment stand or front office.

  • Encourage the use of suitable protective clothing, such as rash guards and swim caps, in the pool. Reward children who practice sun protection behaviors with low-cost incentives, such as stickers or ice cream.

  • Allow users to leave in the middle of the day and return later without an additional admission fee.

  • Encourage employees to clean the pool early in the morning or late in the day.

  • Change any rules that prevent people from being adequately protected.

Erect a protective roof to shade the kiddie pool and the surrounding area.  A steel frame covered with dark blue canvas will provide sun protection for waders and watchers alike, so adults sitting at the edge of the pool as well as their toddlers are shielded.