Skin Cancer Foundation Position: Nicotinamide (a form of vitamin B3) could help prevent skin cancer


The Skin Cancer Foundation comments on forthcoming research findings from Australia

New York, NY (May 15, 2015) — Australian researchers recently released a study abstract revealing that Nicotinamide, a form of vitamin B3, significantly reduces the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancers among people who have had a previous basal cell carcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma. The researchers conducted a year-long study of 386 people, who averaged 66 years old. Half of the people in the study took 500 milligrams of Nicotinamide (Vitamin B3) twice a day and the other half were put on a placebo. The researchers found that people who took vitamin B3 twice a day cut their chances of developing new skin cancers by 23 percent.

“The results of this study are certainly promising, but we believe that more research is needed to determine whether or not to recommend vitamin B3 therapy for skin cancer prevention,” said Skin Cancer Foundation Senior Vice President Deborah S. Sarnoff, MD. “What we know for sure is that everyone should adopt a complete sun protection regimen that includes seeking shade and covering up with clothing, including a wide-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses, in addition to daily sunscreen use. ”

The full study will be presented during the upcoming American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, taking place in Chicago.

###

About The Skin Cancer Foundation

The Skin Cancer Foundation is the only global organization solely devoted to the prevention, early detection and treatment of skin cancer. The mission of the Foundation is to decrease the incidence of skin cancer through public and professional education and research. Since its inception in 1979, the Foundation has recommended following a complete sun protection regimen that includes seeking shade and covering up with clothing, including a wide-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses, in addition to daily sunscreen use. For more information, visit SkinCancer.org.