Tanning

The Dangers of Tanning

A tan, whether you get it on the beach, in a bed, or through incidental exposure, is bad news, any way you acquire it. Tans are caused by harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun or tanning lamps, and if you have one, you’ve sustained skin cell damage.

No matter what you may hear at tanning salons, the cumulative damage caused by UV radiation can lead to premature skin aging (wrinkles, lax skin, brown spots, and more), as well as skin cancer. In fact, people who first use a tanning bed before age 35 increase their risk for melanoma by 75 percent.

For the real facts about the dangers of tanning and how to get a bronzed glow without risking your health, read the tanning information below.

Featured Story

Can You Be Addicted to Tanning?

According to a 2017 study conducted by researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center, 20 percent of women who tan show signs of tanning dependency.

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Learn More About Tanning

Teen Tanning: A Short-Term Decision With Long-Term Consequences

Even after hearing that women who have ever been indoor tanning are six times more likely to be diagnosed with melanoma in their 20s than those who have never done so, it’s hard to believe skin cancer can happen at such a young age. Most young indoor tanners probably don’t believe it can happen to them.

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Fake it to Make it: Sunless Tanning Explained

Ideally, everyone’s sun protection education would begin at an early age. Learning to seek the shade, apply sunscreen and never tan are lessons that help keep you safe both during childhood and later in life. Some of us, however, don’t commit to a sun protection regimen until a little later in life.

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Ask the Expert: Just a Little Tan?

Just as there’s no safe amount of smoking, you can’t get a little safe tan. The damage it does, even if it’s just a bit here and there, adds up over time and contributes to overall aging as well as skin cancer.

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