Four Questions to Save Your Skin

Save Your SkinEveryone should see a dermatologist once a year. Spring is a great time to go, to get advice on sun protection and to have your skin examined before the beach weather begins. Here are four topics that you should discuss with your physician.

Everyone should see a dermatologist once a year. Spring is a great time to go, to get advice on sun protection and to have your skin examined before the beach weather begins. Here are five topics that you should discuss with your physician.

What Is My Skin Type?

Your skin type, which depends on the amount of natural protection your skin provides you, is a key factor when determining your risk of developing skin cancer. If you don't know your own skin type, check out our skin type guide.

What Is My Risk for Skin Cancer?

Skin type isn't the only thing to consider when determining skin cancer risk. Family history, childhood sun exposure, personal skin cancer history and other factors all play a part in determining your overall risk. If you're not familiar with your family's medical history, consider contacting family members to find out if there is a history of melanoma in your family tree.

Do I Need to Examine My Own Skin?

A monthly skin check is a crucial part of skin cancer early detection, although it should not replace a yearly professional skin exam. You want to be as thorough as possible, so follow our step-by-step guide.

What Should I Look For?

There are three major types of skin cancer - basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and melanoma. Each has different symptoms, and pose different risks. Learn to recognize the warning signs of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma.

Remember, the summer brings longer days and more intense sunlight, which adds up to more UV exposure. Check out our skin cancer prevention tips and stay sun-safe all summer.