Sun & Skin News

The Year in Skin Cancer News

We saw the FDA approve a groundbreaking drug, companies debut new technology to help increase our awareness of dangerous ultraviolet (UV) rays and lawmakers pass indoor tanning legislation.

New Treatment, New Hope for Those with Advanced Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

You may have heard about a new medication that was recently FDA approved for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). Libtayo (cemiplimab-rwlc) is a type of immunotherapy called a checkpoint blockade inhibitor, and it’s the first one approved to treat certain cases of CSCC. This is exciting news, so let’s break down how this new drug works and whom it might help.

Are Your Meds Increasing Your Risk of Skin Cancer?

Are you among the millions of people who take hydrochlorothiazide to treat high blood pressure? A recent study by researchers at the University of Southern Denmark showed a connection between this medication and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the second most common type of skin cancer.

Can White Wine Increase Your Risk for Skin Cancer?

Recent studies have suggested some surprising things (not beaming from the center of our solar system) that might increase your risk for skin cancer. We delved into the research to help you assess whether you should be concerned — or not.

Grants Spur Lifesaving Research

The Skin Cancer Foundation’s Research Grants Program has given young physicians and investigators a special boost for studies that served as stepping stones to major lifesaving breakthroughs.

Sun Protection and Vitamin D

You need sun protection as much as you need vitamin D. You can have both, without skin damage or nutritional deficiency. A dermatologist tells you how.

Funding Research to Save Lives

Each year, we award several grants to dermatology residents, fellows and young faculty to fund research and clinical studies related to skin cancer.

FDA Approval of Nivolumab for Stage III Melanoma: What it Means for the Immunotherapy Revolution

With the recent FDA approval of the drug nivolumab (Opdivo®, previously approved for stage IV melanoma) as a treatment for stage III melanoma, we have reached the next important phase in the immunotherapy revolution. It is a revolution that most of the world’s top experts believe will one day, very possibly within a decade, turn advanced (stages III and IV) melanoma into a chronic, or even curable, disease rather than a deadly one.