Sun & Skin News

Embrace Your Scars

Our expert dermatologists tell how to nurture a new scar to get the best outcome — and, if needed, how to fix an old scar to make it look better.

How Much Do You Know About Skin Cancer?

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, affecting more than three million people each year. Despite its prevalence, it’s a disease that’s not well understood by many.

Melanoma at Its Most Curable

Our authors’ recent research shows that melanoma in situ, the earliest form of the disease, is on the rise, especially […]

Do You Know Mohs? What to Expect Before, During and After the Procedure

Since doctors first began treating skin cancer, their techniques for removing tumors have evolved rapidly. There have been many valuable improvements over the years, but Mohs micrographic surgery has truly stood the test of time — it’s come to be accepted as the gold standard for removing the two most common forms of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

After a Transplant: New Dangers

After a lifesaving transplant procedure, new risks emerge, including a higher chance of developing skin cancer. Here’s why, and what patients need to know to protect themselves.

How Serious Is a Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

I’d had a few skin cancers removed before, all basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), the most common type. But when I was diagnosed with a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) on my scalp, it seemed different, and a little more scary.

Money Worries and Melanoma

Here’s one of the many things that keep dermatologist Jennifer Stein, MD, PhD, up at night: people who could be at risk of melanoma and avoid seeing a doctor because they think they can’t afford it.

Amelanotic Melanoma: It Doesn’t Look Like Other Melanomas

Amelanotic melanomas can resemble other skin cancers like basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma, or worse, may be mistaken for benign moles, scars or cysts. This can delay diagnosis, which may prove dangerous, since early detection of melanoma is critical; early melanomas are almost always curable, while those that advance beyond stage I become more difficult to treat. 

Ask the Expert: Why Am I Having Surgery to Remove a Small Basal Cell Carcinoma?

Although the nonmelanoma skin cancer basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is rarely life-threatening, it can be troublesome, especially because 80 percent of BCCs develop on highly visible areas of the head and neck. These BCCs can have a substantial impact on a person’s appearance and can even cause significant disfigurement if not treated appropriately in a timely manner.